Patient Day ready for second major win

Jason Day says the US Open at Winged Foot will test his composure as well as his game as he tries to win a second career major.

JASON DAY of Australia.
JASON DAY of Australia. Picture: Jamie Squire/Getty Images

Jason Day believes patience will be key if he is to win an elusive second major title at this week's US Open, as New York's Winged Foot will test every bit of his resolve.

The former world No.1 is on the hunt for a second big title to go with his 2015 US PGA Championship.

If Day or countryman Adam Scott, the 2013 Masters winner, were to win so this week they would become the first Australian male to claim multiple majors since Greg Norman captured his second British Open title in 1993.

Although Day has come close several times since, including posting the clubhouse lead late in the final round at last month's PGA Championship where he tied fourth, he has been unable to get over the line.

But the Queenslander says he better appreciates how difficult they are to win.

"You can't force your second major win, even though you want it more than anything in your career," Day told AAP from New York.

"I guess I am approaching it with a lot more patience than I was immediately after I won the PGA Championship, even though I want that second major just as much as I always have."

Simple mistakes have often cost Day at the majors.

At the 2019 Masters, he made a double-bogey 7 on the par-5 15th at Augusta in round three and eventually finished the tournament two shots behind winner Tiger Woods.

"Perhaps I tried to force it too much with majors," Day admitted.

Day's close calls certainly have not been for a lack of trying.

He has been one of the most consistent contenders at the majors during the past 10 years.

Day's fourth at the PGA last month was his 10th top-five result in 38 major starts.

The US Open has seemed likeliest for Day to capture another major, given he was runner-up in 2011 and 2013 as well as recording three other top-five results at the event.

However, his putting is not as potent as it was in his sensational 2015 and 2016 seasons when he was world No.1.

Plus, he had never seen Winged Foot before arriving this week for practice.

"I know the rough is going to be really long and thick and the greens super firm," Day said.

"But US Opens have always been a good major for me so hopefully I can produce the result I know I can at this event."

Day will play the opening two rounds alongside Spaniard Sergio Garcia and American Webb Simpson.