Zerafa vowing to 'do a Hatton' on Tszyu

Michael Zerafa insists he will have too many guns for Tim Tszyu in Australia's boxing grudge match of the year in Newcastle next month.

TIM TSZYU.
TIM TSZYU. Picture: Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

Michael Zerafa has emerged from his cocoon to boldly proclaim he's going to crash Tim Tszyu's party next month in the same brutal manner in which Englishman Ricky Hatton ended Kostya Tszyu's career.

Zerafa has long claimed Tszyu is riding on the coat tails of his father's famous name, insisting the 26-year-old has enjoyed an arm chair ride to boxing stardom in Australia.

Now he is promising to shatter his bitter rival's undefeated record in Newcastle on July 7 just like Hatton sent multiple junior welterweight world champion Kostya Tszyu into retirement back in 2005.

"I'm Micky Hatton. I'm going to do what Ricky Hatton did. I'm coming here for a fight, for a war. I'm coming to finish something that should have been finished," Zerafa said on Monday.

After badgering Tszyu for years to fight him, Zerafa has been noticeably quiet over the past month.

Tszyu accused the 29-year-old of running scared and not helping promote Australia's grudge match of the year.

"Tim calls it quiet and scared, I just call it focused and switched on," Zerafa said.

"I have one job and that's to take out Tim Tszyu.

"I'm super confident, I believe in my ability, I believe in my team. I'm going to shock the world. I've done it before, I've been here before. It's familiar territory for me."

While Tszyu has been keeping busy with bouts against Kiwi Bowyn Morgan and Brisbane-based Irishman Denis Hogan in the past six months, Zerafa's only fight this year lasted barely two minutes in a first-round knockout of 45-year-old Anthony Mundine.

A painful and debilitating kidney infection last month and Melbourne's COVID-19 lockdown has also disrupted the Victorian's preparation.

Zerafa, though, says he's fully fit, feeling better than before he beat Jeff Horn two years ago and raring to go.

"I'm switched on, I'm focused and I wish the fight was tonight. I really do," he said.

Happy to play the underdog role, Zerafa believes his experience will come to the fore at the so-called Tszyu-castle Entertainment Centre.

"While I was fighting the big boys, he was drinking warm milk before bed," he said.

"Tim is a great athlete. He's growing with every fight. I can't take nothing away from him. It takes a lot of balls to get in the ring and fight.

"But he's stepping up against a guy who wants to take his head off.

"This is my world title fight. This fight to me is my life. It's going to feed my family."