Wilson flies Aussie flag at WA surf event

The Margaret River Pro is set to finish on Tuesday after organisers decided to wait for better conditions.

Australia's Julian Wilson will be aiming to win his first World Surf League title of the year when the Margaret River Pro concludes on Tuesday.

Wilson secured his spot in the semi-finals on Sunday, but competition was put on hold on Monday due to poor conditions.

Organisers are confident a good swell will arrive on Tuesday, allowing them to finish both the men's and women's events.

Wilson has endured a poor start to the year, finishing 17th in his opening two events before a ninth-placed finish at the recent Bali Pro.

It's in stark contrast to last year, when he posted a win in his first event on the way to a runner-up finish in the world title race.

Wilson needed a good result at the Margaret River Pro to catapult himself back into this year's title race, and he has the chance to come away with the goods on Tuesday.

The 30-year-old will take on Kolohe Andino in his semi-final, while two-time world title winner John John Florence will take giant beater Caio Ibelli in the other showdown

In the women's draw, Sally Fitzgibbons is the only Australian left.

The 28-year-old will take on Brazilian Tatiana Weston-Webb in the first semi-final.

Lakey Peterson, who beat seven-time world champion Stephanie Gilmore on Sunday, will then face off against Carissa Moore in the other semi-final.

Surfers were given a scare on Sunday when a shark was sighted near the competition area.

Seth Moniz and Andino were picked up by jet skis midway through their quarter-final showdown after a shark was spotted behind Main Break.

Competition organisers restarted the heat once they had ensured the shark had moved away from the area.

The incident comes just over a year after the 2018 event was cancelled midway through due to two nearby shark attacks on recreational surfers.

Extra safety measures have been implemented for this year's event.

Drones have been employed for the first time to monitor shark activity, while the WA Fisheries Department have been dropping an acoustic receiver in the water each day to detect tagged sharks swimming nearby.

The event was moved from mid-April to late May/early June in order to avoid the annual salmon run.


AAP