Shutdown work pays off for Sydney FC star

Sydney FC and Socceroos goalkeeper Andrew Redmayne is convinced his work during the A-League shutdown has made him stronger.

ANDREW REDMAYNE of Sydney FC.
ANDREW REDMAYNE of Sydney FC. Picture: Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

Sydney goalkeeper Andrew Redmayne will emerge from the A-League shutdown a stronger player, with his mum helping him to develop non-football skills during the season hiatus.

Redmayne's consistent displays in recent seasons earned him a national team appearance last year, with his athletic shot stopping a key factor in Sydney's success.

While he couldn't practise specialist goalkeeping skills during the shutdown, Redmayne put his spare time to good use.

"I feel like I'm able to jump higher and dive further and quicker and be a lot more explosive," Redmayne told AAP.

"In the break I put on about five kilos, but also all of my numbers have gone exponentially up in terms of strength and power

"They have been the cornerstones of my game in the last few years, so it was really good to focus on those things without the interruption of a football.

"Because when you are training on top of a gym program it's hard to fully focus on the gym program.

"I spent a lot of time at a local park up against the brick wall just kicking and catching against the brick wall, I wasn't working on anything specific, it was more just get out of the house and survive the cabin fever."

Redmayne also started acquiring skills not normally associated with goalkeeping.

"Mum taught me to knit over FaceTime," he said.

The aspect he struggled with most during the shutdown was finding an avenue to satisfy his competitive nature.

"I'm a pretty competitive person and you can play many games of backgammon and Monopoly against your wife but it's just just not the same as competing against your comrades and your compatriots on the pitch or on the training pitch," he said.

"It's good to have that level of competition again and it's good to be at that physical kind of release getting the endorphins pumping while you're running around the pitch."


AAP